GARY COOPER'S 'HIGH NOON' AND HOLLYWOOD BLACKLISTING

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GARY COOPER’S ’HIGH NOON’ AND HOLLYWOOD BLACKLISTING

Friday, March 17, 2017/Categories: Montana Historical Society/Tags:

Contact: Tom Cook 406-444-1645 Release: Receipt

AUTHOR OF NEW BOOK ON GARY COOPER’S ‘HIGH NOON’ AND BLACKLIST COMNG TO MHS

                Montana’s Gary Cooper is famous for his portrayal in the movie classic “High Noon” of a sheriff who stands alone against corruption as his town turns its back on it.

                On Wednesday (March 29) at 7 p.m. at the Montana Historical Society just east of the State Capitol Pulitzer Prize winning author Glenn Frankel will give a talk on, and sign copies, of his acclaimed new book “The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic.  

                “High Noon” is a great western movie, but perhaps in history it will be remembered even more as a condemnation of the blacklisting during the 1950s, when Hollywood was in the grips of the political witch hunt resulting from a national fear of communist infiltration in the industry.

                The movie won four Academy Awards in 1953 including an Oscar for best actor for Cooper. Ironically, many of the political and industry leaders of what is now known as the Red Scare, praised the movie as a celebration of moral fortitude.

Helena native Frank James “Gary” Cooper was inducted into the 2016 class of the Montana

Cowboy Hall of Fame at a recent ceremony in Great Falls. His roots always remained deep in the

Montana he grew up in.

Screen writer Carl Foreman in the middle of the production of High Noon was forced to testify

before the House Committee on Un-American Activities about his former membership in the Communist

Party. He refused to “name names” and later was blacklisted in Hollywood. There are other interesting

connections to victims of blacklisting that were involved in the production.

The new book offers a sweeping look into Cooper’s career during one of the darkest periods in U.S. movie history. The program is free and open to the public. Copies of the new book are available in the MHS Museum Store.

 

 

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